FAQ
Are Norfolk Terriers a healthy breed? PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jeff Nesbitt   
Thursday, 28 January 2010 21:00

 

Norfolk are generally healthy. A good diet, proper weight, plenty of exercise, regular grooming and routine veterinary care should keep a Norfolk in good health.

 

Responsible breeding practices by conscientious breeders should include necessary health screening for hip dysplasia, patellas, heart and eye health on breeding stock. Puppies should be checked by a vet before going to their new homes.

 
Do Norfolk Terriers bark or dig a lot? PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jeff Nesbitt   
Thursday, 28 January 2010 21:00

 

Although each dog is different, most Norfolk are not yappy (bark for no reason). They will keep an eye on things and let you know if someone is at the door or if a furry creature is close by. 

 

 Most dogs of any breed will bark or dig if bored, left alone too much or not exercised sufficiently. Training is the key, if your Norfolk is a digger he can be given an acceptable area in the yard where toys are buried to dig.

 

 
How much exercise do Norfolk Terriers require? PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jeff Nesbitt   
Thursday, 28 January 2010 21:00

 

A long walk or vigorous play within the fenced yard for about 20-30 minutes a day will keep a Norfolk happy and fit. 

 

These terriers also enjoy sharing various activities with you; such as obedience, agility, lure coursing, flat racing, earth dog, tracking, hiking, flyball.  

 
Are Norfolk Terriers good with other pets? PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jeff Nesbitt   
Thursday, 28 January 2010 20:59

Generally, Norfolk Terriers should get along with other dogs and cats in the household if introduced to them as a puppy.  Norfolk Terriers will view gerbils, guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits, mice, birds and other small caged pets as vermin to be hunted

 
Are Norfolk Terriers good with children? PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jeff Nesbitt   
Thursday, 28 January 2010 20:58

 

Norfolk Terriers typically love children. However any dog requires supervision with children, especially when puppies are playing with children under 7 or 8. This is not only for the child’s safety, but the puppy’s since some young children may unintentionally harm a puppy.

 

 

Never get a dog with the intention of teaching a child responsibility. Both children and puppies need an adult caretaker and parents need to accept this before getting a dog. One of the greatest concerns with chidren and dogs is that children tend to leave doors and gates open, and the dog may get out and get lost or hit by a car. Strict rules must be enforced to ensure that gates and doors are always kept closed to protect the dog. Young children should never be allowed to pick up a wiggly pup.

 

 

The rule should be children should sit on the floor and coax the puppy to them. Young children picking up or chasing pups can result in injury.

 


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